Weather Forecast


download August 21, 2014
Natives of Teoc return for reunion
by Reggie Ross, Staff Writer
Aug 21, 2014 | 14 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Teoc Reunion brought people back to Carroll County, and the weekend was full of laughter, memories and many native folk rekindling friendships. According to Mary Fluker, a member of the Teoc Reunion Committee, several people returned and participated in the weekend-long event that took place on the last weekend of July. Fluker, who served as a tour guide for the area, was one of the hosts for family members that traveled from as far as Texas, Milwaukee, Chicago and Michigan. “This was an outstanding weekend for those who were born and raised here, and even those who are now a part of the community through marriage,” Fluker said. The weekend activities began Friday at meet and greet, where people got acquainted at a ceremony held at the Greenwood Leflore Civic Center. A day later, the participants rode a tour bus into Carrollton for a day rediscovering the history of Carroll County. According to Fluker, one of the families that participated in the reunion was the McCain family, descendants of John S. McCain, Sr. Fluker said members of the McCain family, both black and white, were able to see the history of their ancestry. Other families included the Sykes, White, Johnson, Whittaker, Davis, and Richmond families. “We pulled into Carrollton on the tour bus, and there, we started with a tour of the Merrill Museum,” Fluker said. One of the highlights of the Merrill Museum is the memorabilia and artifacts from the McCain family. A McCain family tree is also on display at the museum. “The tour of the Merrill Museum was great,” Fluker said. Following the museum tour, the group toured the Carroll County Courthouse and the school in North Carrollton, where Fluker said some of those present attended years before. “We first went to Marshall Elementary School, then to J.Z. George, and these were old stomping grounds for some of the tourists,” Fluker said. Fluker said many of them attended Marshall when it was known as Marshall High School. “It was an all-black school then, with grades one through 12 until the mid-sixties,” Fluker said. “We then visited the high school and middle school, and they were amazed at the improvements that have been made over the years. The new gym, the athletic building, the football field and the band hall; they were all amazed.” Fluker said memories of the school during the first years of integration were shared, and the first blacks, Lillie McCain and Valarie Nolan, to graduate from J.Z. George in 1969 shared their stories as well. Later in the morning the group headed to North Carrollton’s 4-K convenience store for shopping and later headed up Highway 35 North to Teoc. “On the way to Teoc, we made a special stop, which was requested by Bill McCain of Greenwood, to see the Old Presbyterian Church, called White Church,” Fluker said. “Bill [McCain] was able to give us the history of the church and the cemetery, which is a part of the grounds.” At noon, the group enjoyed in a picnic at Mitchell Spring M.B. Church, where guests enjoyed some down-home cooking and barbeque. “The food was ready and waiting when we arrived,” Fluker said. “There was catfish as well.” On Sunday, there was a gathering at Mitchell Spring for Sunday service. Fluker said Minister Dorothy Whittaker of North Carolina delivered the sermon for the morning. “It was a powerful message out of John 14 verses 1 through 6,” Fluker said. “We gave a salute to those who may have taken part in the activities that provided us as blacks with the rights that we have today, although all blacks do not exercise their rights to the fullest,” Fluker said. Fluker said for the McCains, both black and white, she feels that these types of reunions have a special meaning. “I think that my sister Lillie pointed it out when she quoted a piece from Dr. Martin Luther King’s ‘I Have A Dream’ speech,” Fluker said. “She said [I have a dream that one day sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.] His dream is a reality for us, the McCains. We all had a good time together, eating with fellowship and talking about what it was like growing up in Teoc.”
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
download August 21, 2014
Officials warn of high temps
by Reggie Ross, Staff Writer
Aug 21, 2014 | 13 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Although it took a while, the dog days of summer appear to finally be here. This week, temperatures have threatened to reach triple digit numbers with heat indexes reaching far over 100 degrees. The rising temperatures have some worried. “When it gets like this, it’s hard to stay cool,” said Chad Cain of Vaiden. “These are the times you want to get out as early as possible to get yard work done, because it’s not going to cool off for the rest of the day.” Temperatures starting Thursday are expected to reached the mid 90s, and by the weekend and early next week, temperatures will creep higher to nearly 100 degrees. Carroll County Coroner Ken Strachan said citizens should remember to check on people who don’t have relatives nearby. “The fact is that some elderly people are very vulnerable in this type of weather and will be helped by people checking in on them,” Strachan said. “I encourage people to check on them and make sure that they are hydrated. People need to remain cool through the 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. hours when it heats up.” Carroll County Sheriff Carver said those outside in the heat of the day like gardeners, farmers and roofers should also take caution, as the later it gets in the day, the hotter it becomes. “Anybody that is working outside, just remember that starting early will keep you cool,” Carver said. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, several factors affect the body's ability to cool itself during extremely hot weather. When the humidity is high, sweat will not evaporate as quickly, preventing the body from releasing heat quickly. Other conditions related to risk include age, obesity, fever, dehydration, heart disease, mental illness, poor circulation, sunburn, and prescription drug and alcohol use. So far in August, there have been two reported heat-related deaths in Mississippi. A concrete worker in Jackson County died of hyperthermia while working on Mississippi Highway 613 in Moss Point earlier this month, and an 81 year-old Hamilton woman in Monroe County died of a heat stroke on her back porch in the first weekend of the August. “Heat strokes can happen really fast,” Strachan said. “Numbness on the side of a person’s face is usually the sign of one.” Strachan said those who are working in gardens, should be careful and take frequent breaks to prevent overheating. “Anybody that is working outside, just remember that starting early will keep you cool,” Strachan said.
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
No qualifiers yet for school board seat
by Reggie Ross, Staff Writer
Aug 21, 2014 | 14 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
It is two weeks into the qualifying window for the Beat Five school board position, but no one has qualified to run for the seat. According to Carroll County Circuit Clerk Durward Stanton, there haven’t been any qualifying packets returned for the position, which will appear on the Carroll County election ballot on November 4. Two weeks remain for citizens to qualify for the seat, as it closes at 5 p.m. on September 5. The qualifying window opened on August 6. Those wishing to qualify for the election in Beat Five will have the opportunity to turn papers in at either of the county’s courthouses, in Vaiden or Carrollton. The school board trustee seat carries a six-year term. Rubye Miller currently serves as the representative of Beat Five, a position she’s held since gaining the seat in 1999. According to Stanton, potential qualifiers must be a qualified elector of that district of Carroll County. Stanton said those seeking the position must have a high school diploma or the equivalent and must not have any felony convictions. They must also have 50 signatures from their respective beat. According to records, each school board member earns an annual salary of $2,400, and is reimbursed $.40 for every mile for mileage.
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet